All Tomorrow’s Donuts in NYC, These Aren’t Your Mom’s Donut’s

April 11, 2011

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As graphic recorders, we listen, synthesize and visualize many different conversations and meetings of all kinds. From strategy sessions, to brainstorming and branding sessions, I have heard and drawn it all. This is why I was so particularly excited, that after seeing us at SXSW, Diane McCarter, president of Furlined asked us to support a very unique session she helped organize in New York, called All Tomorrow’s Donuts. Described as a “Dynamic vision session that brings together a group of fifty diverse people who are interested in positive change and co-creation of the future.” During the daylong session, I visualized conversations that touched the divisions and differences in generations, fundamental goodness of human kind, the power and influence of future technology, and the power of catastrophe to serve as a catalyst of positive change.

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I found Dr Morley Winograd‘s presentation of generations, particularly well organized and thought provoking. Dr Winograd posits that there are not just specific generational differences, of say, the Baby Boomers and the Millennials, but that these generational differences are actually cyclical. One generation is defined in reaction to the previous generation. This phenomenon is used to explain the shifts in art movements (Minimalism as a reaction against the emotionalism of Abstract Expressionist, for example). Dr Winograd’s presentation was the first time I had heard this rational applied to the zeitgeist of a generation.

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Ron Pompei, of Pompei AD, responsible for such concepts as Anthropology and Urban Outfitters, spoke about his philosophy of approaching business by first identifying and supporting a culture of a community. In a room of top thinkers around brand strategy it was refreshing to hear that his philosphy is about “Being More, not Having More”
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