Guest Blogger Amanda Lyons’ Favorite Visual Thinking Books

July 8, 2011

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInEmail this to someonePin on Pinterest
1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...


Fellow Brooklynite, and graphic recorder, Amanda Lyons has compiled her top picks on visual thinking. Books featured in the drawing include: Business Model Generation  by Alexander Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur Co-Created by 470 practitioners from 45 countries This book puts a visual perspective on the elements of a business model. I love the many perspectives it comes out with and that I found it inspiring – the book has challenged me to take presented concepts find other uses for them. There are a TON of different ideas, tools and processes mentioned in this book, along with actual examples and case studies. The depth and breath impresses me – as does the fact that it is a collection and collaboration between so many different people. Hence, it is a super strong read.’ VISUAL MEETINGS: How Graphics, Sticky Notes & Idea Mapping Can Transform Group Productivity by David Sibbet David Sibbet is a quick thinker that will keep you honest and on your toes. I was struck by the consideration of all elements of a meeting, particularly those that aren’t always appreciated as visual, sensory or at all – the environment of a meeting. How can a facilitator create space for dialogue versus a presentation? I also appreciate the accessibility to those who aren’t necessarily in the ‘visual field’. WAYS OF SEEING by John Berger, Sven Blomberg, Chris Fox, Michael Dibb, Richard Hollis ‘I keep coming back to this book, and am thankful to my art professor for assigning it many years ago. It challenges some of our cultural assumptions while pointing out powerful fundamentals of how we view and associate to what we see. Berger takes his discussion beyond ‘seeing’ in a nearly philosophical way, “It is seeing which establishes our place in the surrounding world….” Beautiful Evidence  by Edward Tufte What I take away from reading and listening to Tufte is the humbling idea that it is about the content first. Images or visuals should support content and not fight with it. This concept gives me something to strive for – it’s not always about creating a ‘beautiful graphic’ but is always about sharing a clear, powerful message – sometimes complex.’ THE CREATIVE HABIT: Learn It and Use It For Life by Twyla Tharp ‘Although this book doesn’t fit directly under the ‘visual’ category. For me, it fits here because of the activities Tharp suggests throughout the book. There are many great reflection processes and habits, as the title suggests that I have taken on after reading this book. I’m also a fan of her many stories and metaphors throughout the book.’

More about Amanda Lyons

Amanda Lyons is a graphic recorder, team facilitator and Organization Development consultant. As an experiential and visual thinker, she facilitates engaging experiences in all types of business settings including conferences and retreats. Professional credentials include a Masters Degree in Organizational Development from Johns Hopkins University’s Carey School of Business and a degree in Studio Art and English from Lafayette College. More: www.visualsforchange.com/blog
Tagged: